Logos for Creative Professionals

logos for creative professionals

As a creative professional it’s important that your brand closely represents who you are to your target market. At the top of your brand sits your logo. This post explores the three main logo types, some excellent examples of each and what works best within the creative industries.

1. Iconic Logos

Iconic logos are simple, memorable illustrations that are emblematic of a company or product. Imagery is used in either a literal or abstract way to represent your organization. Using an iconic logo type is a less direct approach than using text. This leaves a bit of ambiguity as to the nature of your service or product offering. In order for this logo type to be effective it needs to be; a) Unique, b) Memorable and c) Scalable (clearly visible at smaller sizes). Typically this type of logo is reserved for very well established brands.

Examples of Iconic Logos

2. Wordmark Logos

A wordmark is a typographic treatment of a company or a product’s name. The company’s name is incorporated as a simple graphical treatment to convey a clear and visually memorable identity. The visualization of the represented type becomes a visual symbol. This is a much more literal approach than above and leaves very little room for misinterpretation of the brand. In order for this logo type to be effective it needs to be; a) Legible, b) Unique, c) Memorable and d) Scalable.

Examples of Well Executed Wordmarks

3. Combination Logos

Combination marks are a merging of the above two logo types. They use a combination of both an icon and a typographical treatment. Some combination marks use the type within the icon and others keep them separate. The type and the icon should not compete with one another, a harmonious balance needs to be achieved between the two elements. In order for this logo type to be effective it needs to be; a) Legible, b) Unique, c) Memorable and d) Scalable.

Examples of Well Executed Combination Marks

What Works Best for You

It important when considering your organization’s logo to keep it’s intended use in mind. A strong and well executed logo should work in all of it’s intended applications. Each of the three mentioned logo types have specific requirements that need to be met in order for them to be effective. These elements are universal and ignoring them could be detrimental to your brand.

As a creative professional, your logo is often one of the first elements of your brand that an individual sees. Your target audience is going to make instant assumptions about your business based on your logo. If a template, or something unoriginal is used – what does this say about who you are and they type of service or product that you provide? The same goes for poorly designed or ‘homemade’ logos. It’s best to seek out professional help from a designer when creating your logo. Your success as a creative professional depends on it.

Related Reading
Rules for Logo Design by Tanner Christensen
Wordmark and Combination Logo Samples Sourced from Logospire